Trophy Wall


STEPHANIE KANTOR AND NOAH POLLACK
GILDAR GALLERY
DENVER, CO
JULY 20 - AUGUST 24, 2018

It begins metabolically. Make a mark, stamp an impression on a page, press a thumb into clay. Repeat the motion until a line emerges, a shape begins to form. You keep at it. An imperfect machine, you still require rules to play. And so you make them for yourself. This shape; that palette; holes or no holes; words, or no words; to align with this material history or that. You’ve chosen your constraints and you search out their edges. Flaws are unavoidable, so you learn to account for variance. The line falters, the form leans, the mould collapses, and in that moment you consider your options – failure or a new direction. When following the latter, the line curves, the form changes and on you go exacting mistakes, layering them as scaffolding into something less than perfect and wholly personal. It is a game of your design after all. To win is to make your own trophies, trinkets and artifacts of experience. They are drawings. They are sculptures. They are reminders of the immense satisfaction in choosing your own struggle. - Adam Gildar

Stephanie Kantor's ceramic sculptures and installations converge personal and broader cultural histories. Combining family keepsakes and societal artifacts, her hybrid objects conjure an inversion as the domestic trinket is elevated to the realm of the austere artifact and the museum object gains relatable qualities at the human scale. Her latest series turns towards trophies and awards. These hand-built ceramic and bronze works veer away from the precision in form and distinction of the typical sporting commemorative in favor of the idiosyncratic object. Beginning with early historical trophy forms and specific awards presented to her father for his athletic accomplishments, Kantor transforms these particular objects into familiar yet ambiguous sculptures of achievement. In this light their shelved arrangements becomes a testament not to any individual's successes, but to the underlying human desire to preserve and display moments of personal significance.

PHOTOS BY KRISTEN HATGI SINK








come again :)